First National Bank Building

The First National Bank Building was built at 30 East Main Street. The architectural style is Second Renaissance Revival.

Constructed in 1909 the First National Bank Building represents one of the first steel-constructed buildings in Champaign. The Chicago firm Mundie and Jensen built the Second Renaissance Revival building to represent the strength of the financial institution.

The original marble interior of the bank has been modernized over the years however a glimpse of the buildings gilded past still remains in the main stairway shaft inside the front entrance.

Today the building houses National City Bank as well as offices and law firms on its upper floors. The taller three and four story buildings that once surrounded the building are gone today leaving the bank building to stand alone among its parking lot and drive through motor bank.

Images

First National Bank of Champaign Building, Champaign

First National Bank of Champaign Building, Champaign

Shows the east and north sides of the structure. Taken from a vantage point on the northeast corner of the intersection of Main Street and Walnut Street, looking southwest. | Source: Champaign County Historical Archives at The Urbana Free Library, Urbana, Illinois | Creator: Unidentified View File Details Page

PNC Bank, 30 E. Main Street. Former National First Bank of Champaign Building

PNC Bank, 30 E. Main Street. Former National First Bank of Champaign Building

View: Facing south on Walnut St. | Source: Sam Logan Photography | Creator: Sam Logan Photography View File Details Page

First National Bank of Champaign

First National Bank of Champaign

Source: University of Illinois Archives View File Details Page

"Baseball Today" Banner outside the First National Bank of Champaign.

"Baseball Today" Banner outside the First National Bank of Champaign.

Banner reads "league park," "baseball today," and "take any car east." | Source: Champaign County Historical Archives View File Details Page

B. F. Harris, founder of the First National Bank of Champaign

B. F. Harris, founder of the First National Bank of Champaign

Source: Champaign County Historical Archives View File Details Page

A rendering of the First National Bank of Champaign from March 1921

A rendering of the First National Bank of Champaign from March 1921

Source: Champaign County Historical Archives View File Details Page

Interior view of the main lobby, First National Bank of Champaign

Interior view of the main lobby, First National Bank of Champaign

Most of the ornamentation was lost in subsequent remodels but the marble table in the center of this photo still exists and can be seen temporarily at Spritz Jewelers on Neil Street.The table was donated to the Champaign Co. Historical Museum. | Source: Champaign County Historical Archives View File Details Page

Excavation for the First National Bank of Champaign

Excavation for the First National Bank of Champaign

Source: Champaign County Historical Archives View File Details Page

First National Bank of Champaign

First National Bank of Champaign

Source: Champaign County Historical Archives View File Details Page

First National Bank of Champaign, south side of Main Street looking west from Market Street

First National Bank of Champaign, south side of Main Street looking west from Market Street

Source: The Sholem Family View File Details Page

First National Bank of Champaign, south side of Main Street looking west from Market Street

First National Bank of Champaign, south side of Main Street looking west from Market Street

Source: The Sholem Family View File Details Page

First National Bank of Champaign, south side of Main Street looking west from Market Street

First National Bank of Champaign, south side of Main Street looking west from Market Street

Source: The Sholem Family View File Details Page

Street Address:

30 East Main Street [map]

Cite this Page:

T.J. Blakeman, “First National Bank Building,” ExploreCU, accessed May 27, 2017, http://explorecu.org/items/show/359.

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